Jack White "Lazaretto" Review

1:42 AM

Over the past few weeks, I've been letting Lazaretto nestle into my ear holes and allowing it to make a permanent home in my cranial cavity... Anyways, in that time I've listened to the record at home, in the car on a couple lengthy road trips and at work spanning three different formats (going on four) and with all that, it's a fantastic piece of work and is the newest addition to Jack White's already lengthy and robust catalog.

When looking at this record, you can't just slap a label on it and call it rock or country. It's got a little more depth and personality than that. Country, Jazz, Blues, Rock n' Roll, etc. The sound spectrum is broad with this one.

Lazaretto is the second LP for Jack White as a solo artist and is his 45th LP as a producer.

The sound and energy is clean, dirty, visceral, rowdy, safe, rambunctious and everything in between.


The record is extremely well written from top to bottom, both lyrically and compositionally. Multiple play-throughs are manditory and necessary to understanding and enjoying the subtle and not-so-subtle pieces of composition layered throughout the constantly changing wave of beautiful energy that is Lazaretto.


Jack White began working on the album in 2012 upon discovering a pile of short stories and one act plays that he wrote when he was 19. This was an extended process of a record as a whole and is the longest White has ever worked on an album. And he is a man that cranks the music out to capture the moment.

In my opinion, the best way to listen to this LP is the vinyl version, for the simple reason that there is no compression. The digital and CD versions are both compressed from the source, whereas the vinyl version is tape to tape and has a more complete and full sound to it.

I definitely recommend this album to any true music fans and of course, Jack White fans, because he is as brilliant as ever in his latest entry.
                   
Tracks like "High Ball Stepper" shows Jack doesn't need to lay vocals down to kick your ass and can piece three songs together and make it one cohesive piece. And that "Lazaretto" supplements that God is a woman, but in another song is a man.
                           
Get the fiercely, deliciously decadent piece of artistic audible magic and celebrate the sentiment that great music is still being made.

Noteworthy Tracks (including but not limited to):

"High Ball Stepper"
"Three Girls"
"Lazaretto"
"Black Bat Licorice"

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